Episode 143: One Last Jam with The “Dude” David Hussman

The Agile community recently lost its friend and one of its most inspirational members in David Hussman. Craig and Tony were privileged to speak to him in one of his last interviews at YOW! Conference in Brisbane.

  • David Hussman’s YOW! 2017 talk “Learning in Product: How Wrong are You Ready to Be?”
  • Extreme Programming Explained” is Agile’s White Album, just don’t read it backwards!
  • We make stuff up in software too much, rather than learning from the past and patterns
  • You can’t look at code and tell it is going to be a good experience and we don’t know our ideas are going to be great until we interact with them
  • The tenth principle – simplicity is essential
  • A good developer needs confidence and war wounds, same for Product Managers – they have shipped something crappy and don’t want to do that again
  • Cardboard User Story Mapping app
  • The Shallot (The Onion’s little brother)
  • Craig’s InfoQ interview with David Hussman
  • Dude’s Law – Value = Why / How, when how equals zero you get infinite value
  • Nonban – the least amount of process with the most real and measurable value
  • First follow the product, then follow the process
  • Product Discovery – you need a discovery cadence and a delivery cadence, we need product engineers as much as software engineers
  • Alan Cooper “You listen to what people say, but you don’t necessarily do it”
  • There is not enough written about how products are delivered well across multiple teams
  • We need more clever visualisations in our tools
  • We don’t need more UX designers, we need more people with UX skills
  • Interactions cut across stories – interaction driven design
  • Chaos engineering – moving beyond resilience to intuition, feels like the early days of Agile, no judgement just people trying cool things
  • ProductAgility.org website

TheAgileRevolution-143 (48 minutes)

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Episode 132: Usability Made Easy with Steve Krug

Tony, Craig and Renee are at Agile Australia and catch up with Steve Krug and talk usability and along the way try to figure out whether Tony is lean, agile or just old…

TheAgileRevolution-132 (27 minutes)

Episode 131: Program Management Envato Style with Adrian Fittolani

Renee, Tony and Craig are at Agile Australia and sit down with Adrian Fittolani from Envato and discuss program management and monte carlo simulations. Renee also makes an estimate that is super accurate!

  • Envato – a marketplace for creative assets
  • Lisa Frazier talk at Agile Australia “Leadership in the Digital World
  • utilise bottom up program management at Envato, they have 4 main themes as a company and use self organising themes to meet those themes
  • had to evolve from co-located teams as could not find local resources, they now have any person working in any team wherever they are and make that work, they try to keep teams in close timezones and use asynchronous communication tools, have a policy to work anywhere and additionally a policy to travel and work from anywhere in the world for 3 months
  • the teams responsibility is to radiate program status, currently using a short document with a timeline view
  • launch wall for important items kicking off in the next 2 weeks – helps eliminate surprises
  • project is where more than one team is involved, form a circle around the project (like holacracy)
  • Renee and Craig’s talk at Agile Australia “Coaching Nightmares: Insights We Can Learn from Gordon Ramsay
  • Adrian’s talk at Agile Australia “Better Project Forecasts without Estimates – The Monte Carlo
  • monte carlo simulation- replace subjective estimation techniques that most projects use and rather use a lean approach of takt time to model a project teams delivery
  • takt time – the drumbeat, the time it takes for a process to deliver to another process (e.g. how often a car comes off the production line or how often a story is delivered)
  • value of monte carlo is that it is non-subjective as well as allowing you to decide on the spread of risk you are prepared to take
  • Adrian’s article “Agile Project Forecasting – The Monte Carlo Method” and the associated link to the Takt Time Project Simulation spreadsheet

TheAgileRevolution-131 (28 minutes)

 

Episode 130: Agile Australia 2016 Vox Pop #2

Craig and Tony are roaming the conference floor again at Agile Australia in Melbourne talking to more interesting people in the Australian Agile community:

The Agile Revolution-130 (15 minutes)

Episode 129 – Agile Australia 2016 Vox Pop #1

Picture1Craig and Tony are at Agile Australia in Melbourne and do a lap of the convention centre floor:

The Agile Revolution-129 (13 minutes)

Episode 126 – Agile Snotfest

Renee has been busy being sick (and Tony and Craig are sick of being busy) and thus it has been a long time between cough syrup for our Revolutionists…

TheAgileRevolution=126 (64 minutes)

Episode 123: Some Principles of Lean and Product Development Flow with Don Reinertsen

8265695783_995186c1ce_hCraig and Tony are at YOW! Conference and are privileged to spend some time with Don Reinertsen, who is considered one of the leading thinkers in the field of lean product development and author of numerous books including “Principles of Product Development Flow”

  • Principles of Product Development Flow” book and why there is a waterfall on the front
  • Japanese Manufacturing Techniques was the name before it was rebranded as Lean Manufacturing
  • Taiichi Ohno, the father of the Toyota Production System, hated math and thus preferred to sit on the factory floor and tweak processes, hence it was not a theory driven approach but rather empirically driven
  • Need to understand why things work so you can transfer it to other domains, a big shortcoming in lean manufacturing is that they don’t have much of a mathematical view on what they are doing
  • You can use magic in manufacturing because it is highly repetitive
  • People understand iterations are good to do but do not understand why
  • “Antifragility is beyond resilience or robustness. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better” (Nassim Nicholas Taleb)
  • Agile software people are doing a better job at lean product development because software people have already crossed the chasm of inspect and adapt
  • There are many sources of variability other than just people, such as the Internet and the fact we are constantly doing things people have not done before
  • To get management to listen about cost of delay you need to benchmark what you are doing today
  • Agile eliminated the economic gene, hence it works well bottom-up
  • Easiest way to introduce quantitive based decision making is to find a project manager who wants an economic model (as they will be fighting for resources and the guy with the numbers will end up winning because they can communicate their needs)
  • Lifecycle pretax profit is far more useful than ROI
  • Start with Chapter 1 in the book – describes what is wrong with what we are doing today, then look for the tree that is ready to be pushed over in your organisation as there is no one way of approaching this
  • The low hanging fruit is: visual control boards, economic model, batch size reduction and WIP constraints
  • The first knob to turn is batch size reduction
  • It is 175 principles in small little batches that add value, it is not the ten commandments!
  • YOW! 2015 talk “Thriving in a Stochastic World

TheAgileRevolution-123 (38 minutes)