Episode 138: A Responsibility Deep Dive with Christopher Avery

Christopher AveryIn this episode of the Agile Revolution, Renee Troughton and Peter Lightbody join Christopher Avery again as entertains and educates Australia on The Responsibility Process and The Leadership Gift.

Whilst we looked at The Responsibility Process in Episode 114 of The Agile Revolution, this episode does a deeper dive and looks at:

  • Christopher’s talk at Scrum Australia on how Agile Leader’s improve results with The Responsibility Process. You can check out the LinkedIn article Christopher refers to here
  • Self leadership and self management
  • WL Gore and Associates core values and how it relates to The Responsibility Process.
  • The four minute overview of The Responsibility Process including denial, lay blame, justify, shame, obligation and responsibility.
  • How The Responsibility Process is a self-use tool
  • How to work with others (individuals or groups) using The Responsibility Process
  • The subtlety in the word of “responsibility” over others like “accountability”
  • Overcoming catastrophic events using the responsibility process
  • How The Responsibility Process aligns with other similar fields of thought such as Byron Katie’s “The Work” and Samuel Arthur’s vocal coaching
  • How responsibility is different from “being good”
  • Taking responsibility is about being at choice
  • What organisations can do to make an active practice of responsibility through “wins” using Intention and positive psychology
  • Walking through an example of the responsibility process in action
  • The difference between Quit and choosing not to act
  • Don’t try these with the Responsibility Process…
  • The Leadership Gift Program
  • The Responsibility Process Book

You can ask Christopher Avery for more information through his main website at ChristopherAvery.com.

TheAgileRevolution-138 (50 minutes)

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Episode 114: The Responsibility Process with Christopher Avery

caveryCraig and a late-arriving and quietly spoken Renee talk to Christopher Avery, author of “Teamwork is an Individual Skill” and the visionary behind The Leadership Gift and The Responsibility Process, at Agile 2015 in Washington, DC:

  • Management science says that the problem of business performing highly and being profitable and people having a life at work are highly at odds with each other, Agile has challenged that
  • Organisational Agility and self organising teams have been around since the late 80’s / early 90’s
  • Keynoted the first combined XP / Agile Universe Conference in Calgary 2004
  • The Responsibility Process is now in 26 languages, including Klingon
  • The Responsibility Process is a naturally occurring pattern that occurs in our mind that shows how we respond to upset or frustration in ways that we either cope with it or take responsibility to learn and grow
  • Correlation between The Responsibility Process and the 7 stages of grief
  • You go through each stage, even if it is for a microsecond
  • The mental state of responsibility is available to you all the time
  • Listen for yourself saying “I have to…” then catch it and change it to a statement you are willing to own like “I am…” or “I choose…”
  • The Responsibility Process Game – each day score yourself for when you heard it, said it or caught it
  • Research started in 1984 and collected through participant observation and interaction
  • “The first job of a leader is to define reality” Max De Pree
  • First principle of leadership of The Responsibility Process – “No group in an organisation will consistently operate at higher levels of responsibility than the people to whom they report”
  • The Leadership Gift program for individuals via christopheravery.com and corporate solutions as well via Partnerwerks
  • The Responsibility Process book (coming soon)

TheAgileRevolution-114 (28 minutes)

Episode 112: Inside Spotify with Anders Ivarsson

AndersRenee and Craig are at the Agile Australia conference and talk to Anders Ivarsson, an organisational coach at Spotify, and learn some of approaches that make Spotify tick:

  • Agile Australia talk “Autonomy and Leadership at Spotify” and workshop “Organisational Improvement: Design-inspired Problem Solving”
  • Agile Coaches spend time with squads versus a new role of organisational coach that looks at the culture, ways of working, vision and systemic wastes
  • Spotify is not a model
  • Original Spotify scaling paper, never imagined the spread or the impact
  • Spotify have shared a lot of the things that have worked well, but they do also have challenges as well – one is alignment across teams as the organisation gets bigger so they have been working on visualisation and prioritisation
  • Spotify Culture videos (Part 1 and Part 2)
  • use microservices to ensure that the organisation can work in the way they want to work – great autonomy but a challenge in keeping a consistent design language and customer journey
  • Agile culture is spread throughout Spotify, use what works rather than one particular approach
  • The Oath of Non Allegiance
  • POTLAC – Product Owner / Team Leader / Agile Coach – leadership cell at Spotify
  • use internal blogging to share Agile approaches and patterns, started to recognise the value of story telling
  • Agile Product Management in a Nutshell video – Henrik Kniberg is a genius at making things simple and understandable

TheAgileRevolution-112 (24 minutes)

Episode 106: Turning the Agile Ship Around with David Marquet

DavidMarquetTony, Renee, Craig and special guest host Tyson Nutt catchup with David Marquet, author of “Turn The Ship Around!” and the “Turn Your Ship Around” companion workbook at the Agile Australia conference and talk about how similar a nuclear submarine and an Agile team really are:

  • leadership is not about telling people what to do and how to do it
  • all investments in human beings are long term
  • the approach spread from the bottom up, now the book is on the official reading list of two Navy’s (including New Zealand)
  • “I intend to” does not mean they get to do it – gives psychological ownership and to spark the conversation
  • thinking out loud is about saying what is going on in our head, this even works when teaching your children how to drive!
  • feed the beast – don’t respond by hiding, feed them with as much information as you can as data puts you in control
  • you can’t empower people, you can only unempower them
  • you give control while ensuring competence and clarity
  • whilst not telling people what to do can be good for their learning, sometimes you just need to tell people what to do (in the absence of competence and clarity)
  • good to have you team hold you accountable when you fall back to old habits
  • deal with the “frozen middle” by giving them decision making authority they previously didn’t have
  • when learning about a new team ask “what do you hope I will change” and “what do you hope I won’t change”, this is easy when you have not created the culture
  • “I imagine a world where we all find satisfaction in our work” – you need embrace your fears, on a submarine that can be fear of death
  • need to seek permission to proceed and embrace feedback rather than pursuing signoff
  • instead of saying “are you sure?”, ask “how sure are you?”
  • David is working on a couple of new books – a book of success stories and a colouring book
  • when talking to yourself, use the third person for motivation
  • signup for a weekly leaderhip nudge on David’s website

TheAgileRevolution-106 (40 minutes)

Episode 101: The Lean Mindset with Mary and Tom Poppendieck

craig-poppendieckCraig catches up with two luminaries in the Agile and Lean space, Mary and Tom Poppendieck at YOW! Conference to talk about agile, lean, rapid feedback, culture and leadership. The discussion points include:

  • Making the link between lean and software development and discovering that waterfall makes no sense
  • The origins of the first book: Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit
  • Agile is not lean in software development, Agile is lean in a delivery organisation
  • How long does it take you to put a single line of code into Production?
  • The manifestation of lean really kicked off in 2010 with both the rise of DevOps and the Lean Startup
  • Delivery organisations versus engineering organisations and the journey of Agile
  • Agile has not well addressed delivering the right stuff, solving the right problem and the architecture of rapid deployment
  • Only two goals at ING: Deliver every two weeks and don’t crash production, resulted in rapid feedback loops
  • “The Penguin and the Leviathan: How Cooperation Triumphs over Self-Interest” by Yochai Benkler
  • Latest book: The Lean Mindset: Ask the Right Questions 
  • Create centres of good culture and let people find it, to survive in a competitive environment you need to do something different
  • Goal is to create an environment where people enjoy the challenge of developing software
  • The critical resource to be managed is not capital but the passion and energy of bright and creative people
  • People don’t resist change, they resist being changed
  • Build a change platform, not a change program
  • YOW! 2014 talk – The Scaling Dilemma
  • The military model – leaders have strategic awareness two levels down and situational awareness one level up and the concept of working leaders

TheAgileRevolution-101 (43 minutes)

Episode 15: The Perfect World of Agile

In My Perfect WorldThe usual crew get together again:

Quotes

“Don’t mix dev ops with dev oops!”

“99% of we bapp bugs are caused by 1% of browser types #occupyinternetexplorer”

“Gartner’s analysts are predicting that by 2012 that Agile development methods will be used in 80% of projects.”

TheAgileRevolution-15 (46 minutes)