Episode 97: 3 Things, 3 Letters (Git, CTO, MBA) with Peter Bell

PeterBellAt YOW! Conference, Craig has a chat with Peter Bell, a contract member of the GitHub training team, co-founder of CTO School and the founder of the Startup CTO Summit series and they talk about approaches to learning Git, building better CTO’s and digital literacy for MBA’s.

  • YOW! 2014 talk “How To Undo Almost Anything with Git
  • Balance the appropriate batch size for communicating with your team the work you have completed versus the appropriate batch size for if you mess up you can easily go back – this is typically 2-10 lines of code to the local repository
  • Most teams just need a master branch that is always releasable and all work done on feature branches that are merged into master
  • training.github.com – training options and a number of great resources
  • Learning Git – not easy to learn on the job, balance of basic how to use Git versus a deeper understanding of how and why it works to avoid messing things up
  • CTO Summits run across the world – help people who lead engineering teams to build better software and build software better
  • CTO School started in New York but now runs around the world as a not-for-profit and has built a CTO network
  • CTO’s deal with the same high level decisions around technology that most of us do, but overlapping with how to build better product and how to build a better engineering team brand that the best technologists would want to to work for
  • Don Reinertsen wrote the best book on how Agile works “The Principles of Product Development Flow” – but it is not very accessible
  • Colombia University Graduate School of Business – teaching MBA and EMBA students how to learn about digital literacy and big data which is really how to hire and manage developers when you are not one which is the best nuggets from Agile and Lean that are accessible for a business audience
  • GitHub – create the repository and make your team collaborators – if you cannot understand the gist of the commit messages you have a problem
  • For the business, business leaders can learn a lot from basic Kanban, user stories, doing the riskiest thing first, using tools like SBE to create meaningful specifications

TheAgileRevolution-97 (31 minutes)

Episode 96: YOW! 2014 Brisbane Vox Pop

YOW_2014_logo-pngClearing out the backlog, Craig and Tony roam the corridors at YOW! 2014 in Brisbane and talk to attendees and old friends and colleagues. Despite Tony’s fetish with pineapples and the fact it took 96 episodes to get a mention of ISO-9126 they talk to:

TheAgileRevolution-96 (28 minutes)

Episode 95: User Story Mapping (Something Something) with Jeff Patton

JeffPattonAfter chasing him across the east coast of Australia, Craig sits down with Jeff Patton at YOW! Conference in Sydney. Along the way they fail to remember the subtitle of Jeff’s “User Story Mapping” book and talk about:

  • Art school dropout to software developer to early Extreme Programming
  • Extreme Programming Explained” by Kent Beck (and we agree the first edition was the better version!)
  • One of the secrets to success is having a great relationship with customers
  • Early Agile colleagues included Eric Evans (“Domain-Driven Design“), Joshua Kerievsky (“Refactoring to Patterns” and Industrial Logic), Rob Mee (Pivotal Labs)
  • The product decisions on what to build matter most
  • YOW! Talk “User Story Mapping: Discover the Whole Story
  • Story Mapping addressed the problem of losing sight of the big picture when building very small things
  • Larry Constantine and Lucy Lockwood “Software For Use” – task modelling was the inspiration for Story Mapping
  • Impact Mapping was inspired by Effect Mapping
  • There is no way to build a story map and not stand in the shoes of someone using your product
  • They were initially called “stories” not “user stories”, because of the way we use them – it’s not a change in the way we write documents, its a change in the way we work
  • As a… I want… So that… is just a conversation starter, and they need titles!
  • Dependencies in story mapping – the map helps you see in slices, using stories helps you build the thing you need now
  • Passionate Product Owner course
  • The hope of the User Story Mapping book is that people think differently about stories
  • Your job in software development is not to build more crap faster, your job is to change the world
  • Jez Humble “Lean Enterprise” – output and impact
  • What we do now builds on an Agile foundation – but it is more than Agile – we are missing an umbrella term for product centricity
  • Raccoon! – Jeff likes it, but it doesn’t work in mountain states as they knock over garbage cans!

    TheAgileRevolution-95 (43 minutes)

Episode 94: Agile 2015 Wrap Up

Agile2015Craig and Renee catch up after the last session at Agile 2015 in Washington, DC and talk about the highlights of the conference. Sitting in the atrium near a waterfall, they discuss:

TheAgileRevolution-94 (39 minutes)

Episode 93: I Like Big Boards

OpenJamCraig and Renee are at Agile 2015 in Washington, DC and in the open jam area team up with Jason Tice and Natalie Simonsen from the “This Agile Life” podcast for a crossover episode. Joining in the roundtable conversation are Stephen Vance, Troy Tuttle, Jenny Tarwater, Abby Bangser and Serge Beaumont.

  • Stephen Vance shares highlights from the multi-team agile framework he has put in place at his organization with Natalie and Renee.
  • Abby Bangser and Jason Tice continue a discussion from Lean Coffee at Agile 2015 regarding the benefits of having a full lifecycle Kanban board (product envisioning thru development thru formal testing and acceptance by the customer).
  • While discussing the benefits of “Big Boards” the excellent session that Lisa Crispin and Emma Armstrong presented on User Interface testing came up
  • Next Jenny Tarwater gave props to John Krewson who did an awesome Improv workshop where attendees (including Jenny and Jason) acted out 3-4 minute Improv sketches of how waterfall could complicate simple activities in life like going to Starbucks, planning a trip to Disneyworld or dating and marriage (there are YouTube videos of these Improv sketches somewhere) but the session was AWESOME – thanks to John Krewson for allowing us to get our Improv on at Agile 2015
  • If you’ve ever played cards against humanity, Jenny Tarwater recommends “Cards for Agility” presented by Bob Payne and and Beth Miller at Agile2015
  • Several present on ThisAgileLife comment on Jeff Sutherland’s “Agile Leadership Patterns” presentation and how he made several comments regarding other members of the agile community during his presentation
  • Jason Tice proposes an experiment (to the organizers of Agile 2016 – Bob Sarni) whereby there would be a video interview with presentation submitters prior to acceptance to confirm that their presentation is focused around learning vs. a sales pitch for a product and/or training.  BTW, the conference chair of Agile2016 is Bob Sarni – Jason mis-spoke in the recording regarding Bob Payne – there just happen to be quite a few Bob’s involved in the planning of agile conferences.
  • Serge Beaumont mentions a few of the activities that provide value in addition to the conference sessions, such as the Scrum Alliance Coaches clinic and Open Jam.  He suggests that the conference conclude with some type of “Open Space” in future years.

TheAgileRevolution-93 (40 minutes)

Episode 92: Agile 2015 Day 1

Agile2015Craig and Renee visit Washington, DC for the Agile 2015 conference and debrief in the Agile Alliance Lounge after day 1:

TheAgileRevolution-92 (23 minutes)

Episode 91: Coding The Architecture with Simon Brown

SimonBrownCraig and Tony talk to Simon Brown at the YOW! 2014 conference in Brisbane. SImon is the author of “Software Architecture for Developers”, creator of the C4 software architecture model and Structurizr. We tracked him down after his talk to talk about:

  • YOW! 2014 talk “Agility and the Essence of Software Architecture
  • Create a software guidebook as opposed to big upfront documentation
  • Tony is an old BA apparently… Explains a lot :-)
  • If you can’t sketch out your architecture, you don’t understand it
  • C4 model was created after observations many archtecture drawings don’t make sense
  • Tony shows his age again by referencing Mr. Squiggle (video)
  • A tiny percentage of architects understand UML – do you teach them UML or teach them something simple?
  • Structurizr replaces drawing boxes in Visio or OmniGraffle, creates the C4 model from Java code and keeps it up to date, other implementations for C# have also been created
  • Suggest updating the diagrams at the end of every storycard
  • C4 starts at system context level, opens up to containers, zooms down to components inside containers and then down to the class level
  • Use the model to understand your microservices strategy versus monoliths (article by Rob Annett)
  • C4 is a drill down per system, does not have much to offer enterprise architects – can add an extra enterprise architecture layer if you wish
  • ArchiMate allows Enterprise Architects to model processes
  • We need Enterprise Architects but architects need to be involved in the day to day architecture including code (REA have a delivery engineering team that they spoke about at YOW!)
  • Roy Osherove’s Elastic Leadership – starting point is one architect but then get more people involved
  • Ask your team what an Architect does and you will probably get conflicting answers, it is a not well defined role
  • System Architect and Tech Lead are essentially the same thing

TheAgileRevolution-91 (28 minutes)